26
Apr
12

Stealing a March on the Green Agenda – Guest Post, Alex Hylan

A friend recently told me how, now that the local elections are fast approaching, the Green Party have suddenly reawaken from their slumber and started leafleting him again. Presumably the Greens, like the flower, only blossom when the bees come out to play.

I’ve always found the Green Party quite curious because, like the Labour party, they identify with the centre-left and it’s messages of sustainability, investment and fairness, but yet seem occupied with attacking Labour in the many leaflets that, wastefully, tumble through letterboxes up and down Britain every election time.

But despite this I’ve always had a lot of sympathy with the party. I think they’ve got a really good message and I do worry that the politics of the 21st Century are becoming the politics of maintenance; an accusation that is frequently levelled at the three main parties. Whatever you think of the Green Party, you can’t say that they lack a compelling vision for the future.

The fact is that sooner or later our existing sources of energy are going to run out, and when this starts looming on the horizon it’s going to become increasingly economically viable to pursue green sources of energy. But these changes don’t just happen; their needs to be strong political leadership to make the brave decision to invest in these new technologies.

This is where the Labour party comes in, a party with a track record of striving towards a sustainable economy for the future, not just for now. With today’s figures showing our economy tumbling back in to recession it is clear that we are crying out for investment; to get people back in to work, to readdress the way we harness our energy and to build for the future. This could be the first step in building a new, high-tech green economy that will help to secure our future. It’s just a dream, but maybe one day soon we can stop burying our heads in the sands of Saudi Arabia and work to secure our own energy security. Sure it would cost money, but don’t tell me there’s no money when you’re able to give a tax cut to millionaires.

There has always been an ethical argument for the green agenda, but increasingly there’s an economic argument too. Why can’t Labour be the party that brings that change to the mainstream?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alex is a 19 year old Labour party activist and member of Sheffield Labour Students; studying Politics & Sociology at the University of Sheffield.

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2 Responses to “Stealing a March on the Green Agenda – Guest Post, Alex Hylan”


  1. 1 Sortof labour
    April 27, 2012 at 2:51 pm

    “the centre-left and it’s messages of sustainability”

    *its

    On a less pedantic note, I too share a soft spot for the Green Party and vote them wherever I can, but this is on the premise that they won’t actually get into power until Lucas has hopefully removed their childish opposition to nuclear energy, which is the future. Labour gets props for recognising this, there’s no reason nuclear energy and the left have to be completely opposed.

    • April 28, 2012 at 3:30 pm

      Whilst I can’t speak for Alex and despite my childish opposition for Nuclear power, I think that labour needs to have a debate within itself about Nuclear power. We need people, such as yourself, who are on both sides of the Nuclear argument, to get more involved in Labour and make their case.. We need to encourage participation in Labour of those that may not agree with every tiny little part of a Manifesto.


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